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Home / My health / Kid's Health / Significant drop in AIDS deaths registered

Significant drop in AIDS deaths registered

On Wednesday, the United Nations announced that the number of deaths registered due to AIDS have dropped significantly, in the sub Saharan regions of Africa. The reason for this happy development has been attributed to better access to medicines and medical treatment.

According to estimates drawn by the United Nations, there are nearly thirty four million AIDS patients in the world. In 2005, there were 2.3 million deaths caused due to HIV. The number dropped to 1.8 million in 2010 and the 2012 statistics state the deaths to be 1.7 million.

AIDS
AIDS

The number of children who succumb to AIDS has fallen by almost a 100,000. Advances in medical science and drives to increase access to AIDS medicines have played a major role in reducing these numbers. As of now, antiretroviral drugs are being provided for nearly eight million people belonging to the low income countries.

By 2015, United Nations wants to increase access to 15 million HIV victims. In this regard, the United Nations is in talks with various pharmaceutical companies for development for low cost medicines which can be consolidated into one pill. This can turn out to be very economical for patients as well as medical providers.

The total money which is being spent on HIV treatments is estimated to be $16.8 billion in 2011 and almost 50 percent of this amount is contributed by developed nations. Low income countries spent $8.6 billion on these drugs in 2011.

According to estimates by United Nations, $5 billion has to be added to this amount if majority AIDS patients in low income group countries have to have access to life saving medications. This goal is likely to be met by 2015.

However, there are other problems to contend with. The biggest risk is a flurry of infections. Deputy executive director of UNAIDS, Paul De Lay, said that prevention is still the best defense against the disease and awareness about preventive measures should be increased.

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